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Yorkies in Teacups: Tiny Canine Partners

With an average weight of just seven pounds, Yorkies are already among the tiniest dog breeds, but there are apparently much smaller varieties of these adorable little companion animals.

They can fit into a teacup, which is why they are referred to as “teacup Yorkies”!

Teacup Yorkies are simply Yorkshire Terriers that have been bred from small parents to create little puppies; they are not a different breed from Yorkshire Terriers. They are quite uncommon, and many breeders just won’t breed them because of their size, which can lead to numerous health problems.

Accordingly, the teacup Yorkie can be the ideal toy breed for you if you’re seeking for a tiny pet dog that will like sharing your flat with you, can go almost anywhere with you, and is also reasonably low maintenance.

To decide if a teacup Yorkie is the appropriate dog for you, read on as we go over all you need to know about them.

Vital Records

  • Member of the breed of Yorkshire terrier
  • Two to four pounds
  • The size of 5-7 inches    
  • 7-9 years old.
  • Appropriate for apartments
  • Need a lot of company
  • Is able to speak
  • Numerous health issues linked to their tiny size

The Breed’s History

Several different types of terriers were brought to Yorkshire, England, by Scottish labourers who moved there in the 19th century. In the wool mills and cotton where these labourers worked, they continued to be bred. In order to create a ratting dog for use in the mines, mineworkers also began experimenting with terriers.

Workers combined these two dogs to become the unusual Yorkshire Terrier, which was officially recognised as a distinct breed in 1878.

A show Yorkshire terrier by the name of Huddersfield Ben kept by a Mary Ann Foster named  Yorkshire woman  served as a major inspiration for the definition of the breed. The dog was depicted in a painting by George Earl in the 1890s.

In 1872, the breed had already arrived in the country, and in 1885, the first Yorkshire terrier was officially registered with the AKC.

Smoky rose to fame as a combat canine in the 1940s, which explains the breed’s subsequent surge in popularity.

Although there have always been small Yorkies, the practise of selectively breeding smaller dogs and selling them as teacup Yorkies began in the 1990s, about the time that several ‘designer’ dog breeds began to take off.

The teacup Yorkie is still a type of Yorkshire terrier, despite the advertising of these smaller puppies.

For the smaller puppies that were famous among models and celebrities  later found a path into many family homes, we simply use a specific name.

Gisele Bundchen, , Jay Mohr,Miranda Kerr,   Kevin Jonas, Emmy Rossum and  Naomi Watts are among famous people who are known to adore small Yorkies.

Size

A teacup Yorkie’s adult weight will typically be no more than four pounds. Breeders may also sell little Yorkshire terriers in about the four-pound weight limit as standard Yorkies, while anything larger will be considered to be a standard Yorkie. Regardless of whether the breeder labels them as a Yorkie or a teacup Yorkie, you can anticipate a Yorkie that weighs about four pounds to be about 5-7 inches tall.

Appearance

Teacup Yorkies resemble typical Yorkshire terriers in appearance but are much smaller. They resemble a teddy bear in certain ways because to their round heads, short muzzles, and big domineering eyes.

Notably, unlike many other toy breeds, they don’t have eyes that protrude from their heads. Yorkshire terriers are small canines, but because they were developed as working dogs, they are more sturdy than many other tiny breeds. Although these little fellows still need to be handled with care while playing, they are not nearly as delicate as many other toy dogs. They look smaller because of their short legs. Only a few colours are known to exist in pure-bred Yorkies, and these colours also exist in teacup Yorkies. You might get a black and gold, black and tan, blue and gold, or blue and tan puppy.

Dogs with different-colored coats may not be pure-bred, but they may also be symptoms of a genetic anomaly that may be linked to a serious medical issue.

Although they have low-shedding coats in general, they do need frequent trims since their hair can knot if it grows too quickly. Regular brushing will assist to clear away debris and stop matting. Avoid bathing them too frequently as this might disrupt the natural equilibrium of their hair and make it more challenging to maintain.

Temperament

Although Yorkies are little in appearance, they are renowned for having big personalities, and teacup Yorkies are no exception. They enjoy being around others and are affectionate. They will form close bonds with their family members rapidly, and while though they frequently form close bonds with one family member in particular (typically, but not always, their primary carer), they are very loving people.

Because they enjoy being the centre of attention when spending time with their family, be prepared for some attention-seeking behaviour from them.

If they are left alone frequently, they are also known to experience anxiety related to isolation. They require human interaction and can’t survive if everyone is away at work for many hours a day.

You might be shocked by how harmful such small dogs can be given their size. This anxiousness frequently leads to destructive behaviour.

It is an excellent choice to have someone drops by during the day if you are unable to bring them to work with you. Even if the person is not one of their own kinds, your Yorkie will be delighted to have them around.

Teacup Yorkies frequently experience little dog syndrome and exhibit street-owning behaviour. They pursue bigger dogs and cats and bark at strangers.

Even if this is not particularly concerning, it can be annoying to have them mark constantly whenever a new visitor arrives. Socialising children from an early age can aid in controlling this behaviour.

However, because to their small size, teacup Yorkies can be challenging to socialise because it can be risky to let them run around with larger dogs. Accidents do happen, even with nice dogs, and these puppies are quite small!

The secret to effective socialisation is to avoid holding them constantly. Their tendency to be aggressive towards strangers and to be territorial may be reinforced by this. Allow visitors to roam freely as you converse with them; if they become tired or need a break, they can always return to your lap.

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